Other Courses

Winter Session Course Offerings

This winter ’21, the LSC is excited to offer two new courses: Calculus Prep and HE1111: Strategies for Time- and Self-Management!

Calculus Preparation (no credit)

The Winter Session Calculus Prep Pilot is an opportunity for students who are taking Math1110 or Math1106 in the spring to work on the fundamental concepts and skills needed for success in those courses. Though this is a pilot, it is taught by LSC faculty who have worked with students on this material for many years.

What will students learn in the Winter Session Calculus Prep?
This winter session offering is similar to Math 1101 offered during the academic year. The course introduces topics in calculus: limits, rates of change, definition of and techniques for finding derivatives, relative and absolute extrema. The calculus content of the course is similar to 1/3 of the content covered in Math1106 – Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences and Math1110 – Calculus I. In addition, MATH 1101 includes a variety of topics of algebra, with emphasis on the development of linear, power, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Because of the strong emphasis on graphing, students will have a better understanding of limits and asymptotic behavior of these functions.

What are the logistics of Calculus Prep?
The course will take place virtually, with both synchronous and asynchronous components, from January 4th – January 29th. There will be a total of 19 synchronous classes on Mon/Wed/Fri and individual or small group work on Tues/Thur for a 15hr/wk time commitment.

Is there a cost?
This course is being offered as a pilot. There is no cost since there are no credits earned and nothing will go on a student’s transcript.

Who is Calculus Prep for?
Self-motivated students who are taking calculus in the spring and are concerned about how they will do and/or who have struggled with math in high school or at Cornell should consider participating in this pilot course. Students who participate should feel that having some structure and commitment over break will be useful for them.

How can students participate?
Students can reach out directly to the course instructor, Mark Jauquet (maj29@cornell.edu). Advisors and faculty may also refer students to the instructor via email.

How can I learn more?
For additional information on the course, please take a look at this video from the instructor. You can also reach out directly via email maj29@cornell.edu.

 

HE1111: Strategies for Time- and Self-Management (1-cr)

HE1111: Strategies for Time- and Self-Management is a 1-credit course offered through the School of Continuing Education at Cornell during the winter session. This course is open to all students at Cornell whose advisors feel they would benefit from practice with study skills and time- and self-management techniques. There will be an emphasis on self-reflection and how to develop a plan for success in the upcoming spring semester.

What will students learn in HE1111?
In this course students will gain greater awareness of how they manage their time and how they manage themselves. Through application of project management strategies, time tracking and self- reflection, students will examine their ways of doing things and practice different approaches to time management, improving sleep, managing stress, as well as a number of learning strategies and mindset practices.

What are the logistics of HE1111?
The course will take place virtually, with both synchronous and asynchronous components, from January 4 – January 23. Synchronous classes are on Mon/Tues/Thurs and there will also be individual and small group work. The course is S/U.

Is there a cost?
This course is offered through Cornell’s School of Continuing Education and regular tuition will be charged. Students who are advised to take the course by their advisors should inquire about LSC Scholarship eligibility.

Who is HE1111 for?
This course is open to all students at Cornell who, in consultation with their advisors, feel they would benefit from additional exposure to and practice with study skills and time- and self-management techniques.

How can students participate?
Students can reach out directly to the course instructor, Mike Chen, at msc7@cornell.edu. Advisors may also refer students to Mike via email.

How can I learn more?
Click here for the HE1111 listing or contact the instructor, Mike Chen, at msc7@cornell.edu. A sample  syllabus is here: HE1111 Draft Syllabus

Academic Year Course Offerings

HE1115: Critical Reading and Thinking

Description: In this course students will gain greater awareness of how they manage their time and how they manage themselves. Through self-study, time tracking and self-reflection, students will examine their ways of doing things and practice different approaches to time management, improving sleep, managing stress, as well as a number of study skills, including test preparation, reading, note-taking, and writing and problem-solving efficiently and effectively.

Other topics students will work on include: mindfulness, growth mindset, procrastination, attention and neuroplasticity.

Credit: HE1115: Critical Reading and Thinking is a 2-credit course offered every fall and spring semester. Enrollment preference given to: freshmen and sophomores.

Additional information: Contact Michael Chen, msc7@cornell.edu.

Math 1101: Calculus Preparation

Objective: Math 1101 is a preparatory course for Math 1106 and Math 1110. Classes meet two times per week for 50 minutes. There are no recitations. Structure of class is both lecture and active student participation.

Credit: Math 1101 is a 1-credit course (letter grade only). This course includes both precollege level mathematics and introduces topics from Math 1106 and Math 1110. Individual colleges should determine whether this course can be applied towards their college’s quantitative reasoning requirements.

Description: Calculus Preparation introduces a variety of topics of algebra and trigonometry, which have applications in various disciplines. Emphasis is on the development of linear, power, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Students will have a better understanding of the behavior of these functions including asymptotic behavior and limits and their application to calculus, because of the strong emphasis on graphing. Calculus topics include limits, continuity, derivatives and extrema. Application of these mathematical ideas will be addressed in problem solving activities.

Download: Math 1101 Sample Syllabus